What I Learned in 2016

What I Learned in 2016

See how I learned how to be in a museum, how to Burn in Spain, new psychedelic treatments, the final Summit at Sea, winning licenses, and at the very bottom, everything else I’m up to this year.

How To Become A Female Fortune 500 CEO

How To Become A Female Fortune 500 CEO

As Mary Barra prepares to be the first female leader of a global automaker GM, I wanted to repost a presentation I attended last year from another Fortune 500 CEO. Laura Sen, President and CEO of BJ’s Wholesale Club spoke at the MIT Sloan’s Women in Management Conference in 2012, about her tips for reaching the top of the corporate ladder as one of only twelve female Fortune 500 CEOs. Performance is Proof The result of your work must have a tangible measurable benefit that you can point to and take credit for. In her experience, when you succeed and put up the numbers your gender will be overshadowed by your results. This will also make you a more obvious candidate for promotion. Follow Your Passion Laura started as a French major who liked to shop and ended with a career as one of the most successful women in retail. She says that her work never feels like a job because she loves it. Following your passion is the only way to work hard without burning out, even if where you start isn’t where you end up. Branch Out Try a new class, read a different type of book, or volunteer for something new. Your perspective will be expanded. In Laura’s experience, diversification was the key to advancing her career. When moving from a fashion buyer to logistics at BJ’s she gained a diverse foundation that helps her in her job as CEO today. She added that the more diverse the background of a candidate is, the more likely they will be promoted to general management positions. Promote Yourself In 2002,...
My Inc. Interview: 7 Networking Tips for Women

My Inc. Interview: 7 Networking Tips for Women

Geri Stengel interviewed me about networking tips for women entrepreneurs in conjunction with my monthly Founder Friday events in New York City. I start many meetings reminding the 200 attendees to approach networking events in a thoughtful way designed to make the most of your time. Read the complete article about Networking Tips for Women on Inc. …Connections open doors, doors to money, markets and qualified managers and employees. Pick your venue. There are plenty to choose from. If you don’t like the vibe of one organization’s events, try another. You can choose gender-specific hosted events such as Women 2.0 Founder Friday or the National Association of Women Business Owners, industry specific organizations, such as Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers or general business groups such as Chambers of Commerce. Know your elevator pitch. You are not here to make a sale, so you don’t need to close the deal. You do need to let people know who you are and what you do in a way that makes them want to hear more. Ask questions. Women are great at building closeness and connections through conversation. By asking questions you’ll engage the person and really get to know what they do. Still not comfortable? Pretend you are interviewing people for an article about the event; get the who, what, and why. Make the task less personal. Read the complete article about Networking Tips for Women on Inc.   Geri Stengel is the founder of Ventureneer.com, which connects socially responsible businesses, social enterprises, and nonprofits with the knowledge needed to make the world a better place while thriving as businesses. As a...
16 First Date Skills That Will Make You A Better Business Networker

16 First Date Skills That Will Make You A Better Business Networker

  You’ve heard that WHO you know is more important than WHAT you know, but your education focused on facts instead of making connections. Whether you use these skills to connect to your next investor or to meet the love of your life, many of the same principles that make you a great first date will make you a better business networker too. BEFORE YOU MEET Prepare your soundbites. Almost every meeting will include questions like “what do you do?” and “where are you from?” Instead of the standard answers, prepare short stories that make you sound interesting, fun, and unique. Don’t tell your latest acquaintance that you’re building the next social network and looking for a technical co-founder. That’s predictable and so common it’s forgettable. Tell him how you combined your love of website design with yoga to create a video blog that teaches parents how to introduce yoga to their kids and it’s gotten far more popular than you could have imagined. If this isn’t natural to you, check out books on how to talk about yourself with just the right amount of self promotion such as BRAG! The Art of Tooting Your Own Horn Without Blowing It by Peggy Klaus. Investigate to find common ground. It’s easier to bond with someone when you have something in common. If you’ve lived in the same states, vacationed to the same places, or went to the same school, you’ll want to bring that up early to build rapport. With all the free information available on the internet, there’s no excuse to not know that they love shiba inu puppies too. I use tools like 123People...